Posts Tagged ‘senator’

21
December 2020

Visa ban?

The Moscow News

Russian human rights activists and political opposition members have sent a new version of the controversial “Magnitsky list” to the U.S. Senate, proposing to include the names of 305 Russian officials connected to the Mikhail Khodorkovsky and Yukos case – but whether or not anything will come of this proposal remains to be seen.

According to Gazeta, ru, Russia’s Prosecutor General, Yury Chaika, the head of Russia’s Investigative Committee, Aleksandr Bastrykin, and Moscow city court chairman Olga Yegorova are on the list together with prosecutors and judges. The original “Magnitsky list” included names of 60 Russian officials who, along with their families, would be denied American visas for their alleged involvement in the death of lawyer Sergei Magnitsky. Proposed by senator Ben Cardin, the visa restrictions went into effect in July.

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20
February 2014

Sens. McCain And Murphy Working On Ukraine Sanctions Bill

BuzzFeed

A Magnitsky Act-style bill would target those behind violence that has killed dozens of protesters in Ukraine. Updated with statement from McCain and Murphy.

Sens. John McCain and Chris Murphy are writing a bill that would enact sanctions against people responsible for violence against anti-government protesters in Ukraine, two sources with knowledge of the bill told BuzzFeed.

“Folks are working on it,” a senior Senate aide said on Wednesday. “Would be targeted sanctions against individual Ukrainians responsible for ordering or carrying out violence against peaceful protesters, as opposed to blanket sanctions against Ukraine.”

The specific details of the bill are not yet clear. McCain and Murphy will announce the bill today, a source said. The two senators visited Ukraine in December to lend support to protesters who have been demonstrating against Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych’s decision to turn the country closer to Russia and reject a deal with the European Union.

Pressure to enact sanctions against Ukraine has mounted after dozens of anti-government protesters were killed and hundreds injured in clashes with police this week.

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02
September 2013

Boxer, Murphy, Shaheen, McCain Urge Focus on Russia’s Repressive, Discriminatory Policies at G-20 Summit

U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer

For Immediate Release:
August 30, 2013
Contact: Washington D.C. Office (202) 224-3553
Boxer, Murphy, Shaheen, McCain Urge Focus on Russia’s Repressive, Discriminatory Policies at G-20 Summit – Senators Ask President Obama to Call Attention to Violations of Basic Freedoms Under Russian President, Including Jailing of Opposition Figures and Laws Targeting NGOs and the LGBT Community

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senators Barbara Boxer (D-CA), Christopher Murphy (D-CT), Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), and John McCain (R-AZ), all members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, today sent a letter to President Obama urging him to use his upcoming trip to the G-20 Leaders’ Summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, as an opportunity to call attention to the Russian government’s ongoing crackdown on human rights and civil society. The Summit begins on September 5.

“The United States must not give President Putin a free pass on repression,” the Senators wrote. “We hope we can count on you to prioritize advancing human rights as a central objective of U.S. relations with Russia.”

In the letter, Senators Boxer, Murphy, Shaheen and McCain called for a renewed focus by the U.S. and its allies on Russia’s deteriorating human rights situation and the government’s assault on basic freedoms—including criminalizing peaceful speech, discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation, imprisoning those who criticize President Putin or his security force allies, and harassing and intimidating lawyers who stand up for human rights defenders.

The Senators wrote, “Russia is a great power with enormous potential to help solve the world’s problems. But great powers should respect international human rights norms and uphold the rule of law both at home and abroad.”

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09
August 2013

STATEMENT BY SENATOR JOHN McCAIN ON RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT ASYLUM FOR EDWARD SNOWDEN

John McCain

August 1, 2013

Washington, D.C. ­– U.S. Senator John McCain today released the following statement regarding reports that the Russian government has granted Edward Snowden a one-year asylum:

“Russia’s action today is a disgrace and a deliberate effort to embarrass the United States. It is a slap in the face of all Americans. Now is the time to fundamentally rethink our relationship with Putin’s Russia. We need to deal with the Russia that is, not the Russia we might wish for. We cannot allow today’s action by Putin to stand without serious repercussions.

“The first thing we should do is significantly expand the Magnitsky Act list to hold accountable the many human violators who are still enjoying a culture of impunity in Russia. We should push for the completion of all phases of our missile defense programs in Europe, and move expeditiously on another round of NATO expansion, including the Republic of Georgia. We should challenge the political convictions and detentions of Russian dissidents such as Mikhail Khodorkovsky and Alexei Navalny. And perhaps most importantly, we should speak out on behalf of the many people in Russia who increasingly are finding the courage to peacefully demand greater freedom, accountability, and rule of law in Russia.

“Today’s action by Putin’s Russia should finally strip away the illusions that many Americans have had about Russia the past few years. We have long needed to take a more realistic approach to our relations with Russia, and I hope today we finally start.” hairy woman быстрые займы на карту https://www.zp-pdl.com www.zp-pdl.com payday loan

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06
August 2013

Why Did Putin Grant Edward Snowden Asylum? Revenge

The Diplomat

Face the Nation, one of America’s premier Sunday political talk shows, spent a good part of this weekend’s broadcast discussing something many in U.S. political circles have been wondering this week: why would Russian President Vladimir Putin give sanctuary to Edward Snowden?

Speaking of the decision to offer Snowden asylum, Face the Nation host Bob Schieffer asked Senator Chuck Schumer, “Why do you think Putin did this? I mean, this, kind of, has a high school-like scenario to it. But, you know, often nations have some reason behind their actions. Do you think this was a calculated strategy on his part?”

The senior New York Democrat responded by saying that he felt it had to do with Putin’s resentment over Russia losing the Cold War and the general decline in Russian power.

Speaking to the New York Times’ David Sanger later in the show, Schieffer again returned to the subject, saying of Snowden’s decision, “It’s kind of following a kind of high school scenario here. Here you have Putin sort of — sort of taking on the role of Hugo Chavez. I mean, nobody thought Venezuela posed any kind of threat to the United States, but Chavez apparently thought he could really make his place in the world by poking his finger in the eye of the giant,” referring to the United States.

Sanger concurred saying, “I think that’s exactly right, Bob. This is half high school, half Cold War playbook.”

There may be some truth to these statements. Nonetheless, they show the complete lack of self-awareness that is too often commonplace among American leaders in their interactions with the outside world.

The truth of the matter is that if Edward Snowden had been a Russian spy who arrived in New York or Washington after telling the international press all about Moscow’s domestic surveillance programs, the U.S. would have provided him asylum without question.

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05
August 2013

Senators Demand Repercussions For Russia In Wake Of Snowden Asylum

Buzzfeed

Pressure is building in Congress for President Obama to move the G-20 summit in September away from St. Petersburg in light of Russia’s granting Edward Snowden asylum on Thursday.

“Russia has stabbed us in the back, and each day that Mr. Snowden is allowed to roam free is another twist of the knife,” said Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) in a statement. “Others who have practiced civil disobedience in the past have stood up and faced the charges because they strongly believed in what they were doing. Mr. Snowden is a coward who has chosen to run. Given Russia’s decision today, the President should recommend moving the G-20 summit.”

“Yes. Yes I do,” Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte, a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, told Buzzfeed when asked if she thought Obama should consider not attending the G-20 meeting.

“I think this is a troubling pattern,” Ayotte said, pointing to Putin’s support for Syrian dictator Bashar Assad, his crackdown on adoptions and a string of other decisions in which he’s “basically just trampling on what we’ve expressed to him that we want to see happen … we’re not just talking about Snowden here.”

Other senators didn’t explicitly call for Obama’s plans to change, but strongly condemned Putin for allowing Snowden into Russia instead of returning him to the U.S.

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26
July 2013

WICKER: Russia’s adoption freeze – Is a humanitarian solution within reach?

Washington Times

When the Russian government decided late last year to forbid international adoptions with the United States, the heartbreak was swift and palpable. The Kremlin’s political opportunism had reared its ugly head — denying orphans the chance at a better future and leaving adoptive families incomplete.

Approximately 300 U.S. families, including several in my home state of Mississippi, were in the process of adopting children from Russia when the ban took effect in January. These families had traveled across the world to meet and bond with the children they hoped to welcome into their lives. As the extensive paperwork and formalities progressed, the emotional ties grew stronger.

Today, these “pipeline” families are working tirelessly to challenge Russia’s broken promises and bring attention to the hundreds of orphans still waiting for Mom and Dad. Their pleas have yet to stir a response from Russian officials, who refuse to allow the pending cases to move forward. But growing international support has inspired new hope that a humanitarian solution should prevail.

The resounding consensus by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) is encouraging. Earlier this month, the parliamentary assembly of the 57-country organization overwhelmingly passed a measure I introduced to uphold the sanctity of the adoption process between nations.

Specifically, the resolution — the first of its kind for the OSCE — urges countries to settle differences in a “positive and humanitarian spirit,” with the goal of avoiding the “disruption of intercountry adoptions already in progress that could jeopardize the best interests of the child.” Although the measure does not carry legal weight, it bears moral authority that I hope will advance negotiations between the State Department and Russian officials in the coming months. Above all, it affirms the positive influence of family on the life of a child.

Most would agree that intercountry adoption is a sensitive issue with unique considerations. Likewise, we recognize that countries have the right to control how they conduct their adoption processes. But Russia’s severing of established relationships between adoptive parent and child unfairly changes the rules in the middle of the game. In passing my resolution, the OSCE has sent a clear signal that the concerns of some 300 families in the final stages of the adoption process are legitimate, important and worthy of attention.

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11
April 2013

Senator Blunt Urges President Obama To Address Blatant Pattern Of Russian Intimidation, Repression

Senator Roy Blunt

U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (Mo.) sent a letter to President Barack Obama this week expressing his concern for Russian President Vladimir Putin’s “broader pattern of blatant intimidation and authoritarianism,” as demonstrated by Putin’s ban on U.S. adoptions and the recent expulsion of a Russian lawmaker from his party after he met with Blunt and other U.S. lawmakers in April 2013 to improve relations between the two countries.

“Last month I had the opportunity to visit with Russian opposition lawmaker named Dmitry Gudkov, who was in the United States in an effort to improve relations between our countries. During our visit we discussed the Russian Government’s recent ban on U.S. adoptions, among other important matters. When he returned to Russia, Mr. Gudkov was expelled from his party and accused of treason for discussing these matters with American lawmakers,” wrote Blunt. “I’m deeply concerned about Russia’s further slide into authoritarianism and believe that the United States should provide international leadership that both calls attention to this behavior and take steps to address it.”

On January 18, 2013, Blunt joined a bipartisan coalition of more than 70 House and Senate members in sending a letter to Putin urging him to reverse a law banning the adoption of Russian children by American families. Blunt and his colleagues also sent a separate letter to President Obama urging him to help American families by encouraging the Russian government to complete cases that were pending before the adoption ban took effect.

On January 1, 2013, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed a bipartisan resolution introduced by Blunt and U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu (La.) strongly condemning President Putin’s ban on the adoption of Russian children by Americans families and urging the Russian government to reconsider the law.

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20
July 2012

US Senator Wicker speaks on Senate Floor about Magnitsky Act

Senator Roger Wicker

Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS) spoke on the floor of the US Senate in support of the “Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act” whichy is making its way through both House of of Congress. Senator Wicker also requested that the speech made by Senator John McCain in Monaco at the OSCE Parliamentary Assembley Annual Conference in July, should be entered into the Congressional record, and fully supported the passage of a Magnitsky resolution at the OSCE PA.

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